To Be a Feature Film

‘An Interactive Movie’. Notes by creative producer M. Athol Hepburn.

Some notes stimulated by seemingly forward thinking guff about transmedia experience being the future of story-telling

eg. http://nofilmschool.com/2013/09/transmedia-birth-of-a-new-art-form/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nofilmschool+%28nofilmschool%29As a movie, ‘Blood & Mortar’ seeks to be an “…unnaturally disturbing feature film” (perhaps describable as a post-industrial, neo-gothic piece), which will “…entertain, horrify and…”

ultimately…

“…reveal The Capital’s deepest darkest secret.”

This latter aspect points directly at the other entire goal of ‘Blood & Mortar’, which is to be an interactive experience, in fact, part of an ongoing interactive experience. But not of the type alluded to, almost evangelically, by the latest generation of, essentially, ‘virtual-reality’, by any other name, advocates.
Interactive engagement in the ‘Blood & Mortar’ story is a pervasive experience. Its key note is a recognition of the untrammeled power of the human imagination and a consequent non-dependence on technology to augment it. In fact the filmic outcome is nothing more than an effort to represent it and to provide a shared platform to temporarily express it.  

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Buying in to a certain conventional wisdom, the creative producer has nevertheless agreed to prioritise the filmic outcome in terms of what we as a production team are projecting on to the public awareness.
He is agreed that the production of a feature film is such a substantial undertaking that we should concentrate on that. But at the same time it should be understood that we are especially contributing to the development of the art form by one of the ways that we are producing the movie. And that way is by encouraging an ongoing pervasive interaction with it’s story (and its production).

This engagement has and will continue to be discussed and developed in other forums. But for here let it suffice to say that the ‘Blood & Mortar’ story emerges out of a collective vision of a world that exists at the edge of the mundane world, beyond which lays a void of incomprehensible phenomena, utterly horrifying without some form of proven guidance and initiation.  
From it’s pre-conception the ‘Blood & Mortar’ story has ostensibly developed out of engagement and investigation into such orders of reality. And throughout its development there have been constant opportunities for other brave souls to come along for the journey, guided, if you like, by the experience of the instigators.
More specifically, certain cultural agents who are more or less experienced with such engagement have cultivated the circumstances for development of an urban legend which is embedded within the greater millieu, for participation in the way the truth behind it ultimately comes to light, and, beyond that, what this actually leads to.

ImageThe conception of the movie, the campaign to make the movie, the production of the movie, and the revelation and repercussions of such once the movie is released, are all part of shared, interactive experience, in which the imagination of participants is paramount and the mode of engagement pervasive and encompassing of both virtual and physical platforms.

Ultimately the interactive experience aught not to embed the participant in yet another apparently concrete ‘reality’ like a ‘second-life’ or a ‘virtual reality’ but should free them up from such limitations and afford a glimpse of the nebulousness of so-called reality and the power of imagination.
The world which is co-created and represented in ‘Blood & Mortar’ is not, ultimately, powerful because it is ‘like it is real’ but because it is real and unreal while casting light on deep dark places of the human experience.

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